The lucky 47 who’ve already ‘won’ their General Assembly races

June 26th, 2014 at 10:55 am by under Nesi's Notes, On the Main Site

RI_Statehouse_SouthDozens of General Assembly races are effectively over before a single ballot is cast because only one candidate filed for the seat by Wednesday’s 4 p.m. deadline, according to a WPRI.com analysis of information posted by the secretary of state’s office.

That includes 45% of all senators and 40% of all House lawmakers – approaching half of each chamber.

Here’s who is currently listed as running unopposed in both the primary and the general election and therefore probably won’t have to campaign to win re-election (or, in one case, a first election) this fall:

  1. Sen. Maryellen Goodwin (D), District 1
  2. Sen. Dominick Ruggerio (D), District 4
  3. Sen. Paul Jabour (D), District 5
  4. Sen. James Doyle (D), District 8
  5. Sen. Walter Felag (D), District 10
  6. Sen. Lou DiPalma (D), District 12
  7. Sen. Dan DaPonte (D), District 14
  8. Sen. William Conley (D), District 18
  9. Sen. Ryan Pearson (D), District 19
  10. Sen. Roger Picard (D), District 20
  11. Sen. Frank Lombardo (D), District 25
  12. Sen. Frank Lombardi (D), District 26
  13. Sen. Joshua Miller (D), District 28
  14. Sen. Michael McCaffrey (D), District 29
  15. Sen. James Sheehan (D), District 36
  16. Sen. Susan Sosnowski (D), District 37
  17. Sen. Dennis Algiere (R), District 38

  1. Rep. Chris Blazejewski (D), District 2
  2. Rep. Thomas Palangio (D), District 3
  3. Rep. John DeSimone (D), District 5
  4. Rep. Raymond Hull (D), District 6
  5. Rep. John Lombardi (D), District 8
  6. Rep. John Carnevale (D), District 13
  7. Rep. Nicholas Mattiello (D), District 15
  8. Rep. Robert Jacquard (D), District 17
  9. Rep. Joseph McNamara (D), District 19
  10. Rep. David Bennett (D), District 20
  11. Rep. Joseph Shekarchi (D), District 23
  12. Rep. Joseph Trillo (R), District 24
  13. Rep. Jared Nunes (D), District 25
  14. Rep. Patricia Serpa (D), District 27
  15. Rep. Donald Lally (D), District 33
  16. Rep. Brian Patrick Kennedy (D), District 38
  17. Rep. Stephen Ucci (D), District 42
  18. Rep. Cale Keable (D), District 47
  19. Rep. Michael Morin (D), District 49
  20. Rep. Robert Phillips (D), District 51
  21. Rep. William O’Brien (D), District 54
  22. Rep. Arthur Corvese (D), District 55
  23. David Coughlin (D), District 60 (incumbent Rep. Elaine Coderre is retiring)
  24. Rep. Raymond Johnston (D), District 61
  25. Rep. Gregg Amore (D), District 65
  26. Rep. Jan Mailk (D), District 67
  27. Rep. Raymond Gallison (D), District 69
  28. Rep. Jay Edwards (D), District 70
  29. Rep. Marvin Abney (D), District 73
  30. Rep. Deborah Ruggerio (D), District 74

It’s always possible someone could mount a write-in campaign against one of these candidates, but defeating an incumbent without your own name on the ballot is a very, very tall order. On the other hand, it’s also possible the number of uncontested races will actually grow if some of the individuals currently listed as challengers in various races don’t return enough signatures by the July 11 deadline.

One other thing that could change: political parties also have until the end of Thursday to nominate their own candidates in races where they don’t have a candidate yet, WPRI 12 political analyst Joe Fleming notes. There are currently 39 Republicans and 25 independents listed as running (including incumbents).

This post has been updated twice to reflect additional filings.

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10 Responses to “The lucky 47 who’ve already ‘won’ their General Assembly races”

  1. SGH says:

    Just as a note, Republicans are only listed as having filings in 36 seats. This is the fewest they’ve ever run in the elections under the downsized General Assembly.

    It’s especially bad in an off election year, when they stand a better chance of making gains.

  2. Jeff Crawford says:

    Good. That will make it easy for the State Police to locate them and question them about 38 Studios.

  3. [...] For a state that claims its General Assembly members are too ensconced, there certainly are a lot of legislators running unopposed. More than 44 percent of incumbents will be alone on the ballot. [...]

  4. Bill Palazzo says:

    Is that what they call Lemming-ade? We never learn do we?

  5. lost in ri says:

    a few reasons—

    1. the unions control many of the seats

    2. the republicans have to get their act together

    3. there are fewer people in the state with civic pride that want to make the state better. those people that in the past have contributed to the state in many ways including run for office are now gone. and replaced by people that feed off the state. many bring very little to the state and this is one of the many costs that ri must bear.

  6. Carl Maxwell says:

    I think that it is a two edge sword. Who would truly be proud of saying they were a state senator or representative from Rhode Island. I think I would be more proud to be a prostitute or heroin addict! These people do nothing but support there unions or special interest. In the meantime they confiscate your money and laugh all the way to the bank. The big losers are the people of the state of RI. So I hope you enjoy your lack of beach access, ocean fishing license, seat belt law, high gas taxes and lousy school system. As for me I don’t have it in my heart to deal with these people.

  7. [...] Meet the 48 lucky General Assembly lawmakers who are unopposed for [...]

  8. Samuel says:

    LOL….look at all the Democrats. No wonder this State is F’d.

  9. [...] My post last week that roughly 40% of the General Assembly will be unopposed on the ballot this year drew the responses you’d expect. How can so many lawmakers skate by in a state with the [...]

  10. [...] My post final week that roughly 40% of a General Assembly will be unopposed on a list this year drew a responses you’d expect. How can so many lawmakers movement by in a state with a nation’s [...]