The Saturday Morning Post: Quick hits on politics & more in RI

July 12th, 2014 at 5:00 am by under Nesi's Notes, On the Main Site, The Saturday Morning Post

Happy Saturday! Here’s another edition of my weekend column here on WPRI.com – as always, send your takes, tips and trial balloons to tnesi@wpri.com, and follow @tednesi on Twitter.

1. The three candidates running for general treasurer – Ernie Almonte, Frank Caprio and Seth Magaziner – squared off Friday in the first of this month’s pre-primary debates on Newsmakers, and the hour-long exchange gave a clear indication of how Caprio and Magaziner are pitching themselves to Democratic primary voters. Caprio, a familiar face, touted his record during his previous term in the treasurer’s office, casting himself as not only more experienced than Magaziner but also wiser today than he was when he made his botched run for governor. Even though he’s not technically the incumbent, in many ways Caprio is really running a re-election campaign, with all the advantages and challenges that implies. Magaziner is keeping a tight focus on the pension fund’s investment returns, and the need for the state to start matching the national average. (Cate Long might approve.) The 30-year-old is also trying to use his youth to his advantage by arguing the State House needs new faces, and to cast Caprio as a fair-weather Democrat who isn’t loyal to the party. Waiting in the wings is Almonte, a Democrat until last month who now has tacit GOP support for his independent bid. He emphasized his background as an accountant, suggesting the treasurer should be focused on math and money rather than partisan politics. That message could resonate in a state where one in two voters are registered independents, though non-party bids are always uphill battles.

2. Both Frank Caprio and Seth Magaziner are trying to navigate political tightropes in their campaigns. Caprio’s political profile was long that of a moderate or even conservative Democrat, and he’s acknowledged flirting with the Republican Party. Yet in his comeback bid for treasurer he’s striking a populist tone critical of Wall Street and high finance that wouldn’t be out of place with the party’s Elizabeth Warren wing: he strongly opposed the rehiring of the state’s longtime financial advisers at First Southwest, suggested the state is wasting money with hedge funds, and raised doubts about paying the 38 Studios bonds. All that sounds like an appeal to voters who dislike Gina Raimondo – but when asked to judge Raimondo’s work as treasurer, Caprio gave her an “A” grade. Magaziner, though, has challenges of his own. He is strongly supported by some progressives, who bonded with him while he was serving on the Marriage Equality Rhode Island board, and has won the endorsement of unions such as the National Education Association Rhode Island. Yet he’s also backed by some pro-Raimondo types who see him as the best option to protect her pension law, he is open to investing with hedge funds, and he supports paying the 38 Studios bonds. Meanwhile, a huge question remains unanswered: what will Bill and Hillary Clinton do to help Magaziner, the son of their old friend Ira?

3. A surprising moment in Friday’s debate came when the candidates were asked whether they voted for Barack Obama or Mitt Romney two years ago. Obama had very publicly snubbed Frank Caprio in 2010, which of course led to the infamous “shove it” comment. Caprio went on to disaffiliate from the Democratic Party and expressed seeming disdain for the president the weekend before the 2012 election, writing on Twitter: “This election has come down to who shows up-JFK’s ‘silent majority’ for @MittRomney- or women & the celebrity culture for @BarackObama.” But Caprio surprised Tim White and me during the debate by saying he nevertheless walked into the voting booth the following week and cast a ballot for Obama. Seth Magaziner said he voted for Obama; Ernie Almonte said his vote is a private matter.

4. Two more pre-primary debates are coming up on Newsmakers this month. Next week, the Democratic candidates for lieutenant governor - Frank FerriDan McKee and Ralph Mollis – will square off. The following week it will be the Democratic candidates for secretary of state – Guillaume De Ramel and Nellie Gorbea. Be sure to tune in!

5. It’s hard to miss Democratic gubernatorial candidate Clay Pell on TV these days, and for good reason. Pell has spent $764,000 on TV ads so far this year, not much less than the $836,000 that Gina Raimondo has spent; Angel Taveras is far behind, having spent just under $300,000. Pell just put up a new ad – check it out here – that features Amanda Boswell, a Portsmouth high-school teacher, lauding his education policies. What we don’t know is how much benefit Pell and Raimondo have gotten out of all this TV time. With no new public polls since the last WPRI 12/Journal survey in May it’s impossible to say for sure, but their campaigns have to hope the numbers have moved significantly. Pell, in particular, had plenty of room to grow from his 12% in May. Taveras, meanwhile, is well aware he needs to find the cash to hold his own. “With just 60 days left until the election, Danny and I will be making critical budget decisions based on where we are at midnight tonight,” he told supporters in a fundraising email Friday. (Danny Kedem is his campaign manager.)

6. Aaron Renn, the Urbanophile blog author who was a Rhode Islander for a short time, is following up his recent City Journal article laying out Rhode Island’s economic problems with a series of posts that flesh out his views and what he thinks would help turn things around. “Rhode Island’s fundamental economic problem,” he argues, “is that it has been acting like it’s selling a premium product from a structurally advantaged position when in reality it’s selling a commodity product into a highly competitive global marketplace.” Renn isn’t alone in thinking that; in recent months, state leaders from Nick Mattiello and Gina Raimondo to George Nee have all emphasized the need for Rhode Island to make sure its policies aren’t regional or national outliers. Renn’s Part I is here and his Part II is here.

7. “Fossil industry is the subprime danger of this cycle,” argues Ambrose Evans-Pritchard. Worth reading.

8. Adam Brand, who served as former Congressman Patrick Kennedy’s chief of staff from 2007 to 2010, is leaving Capitol Hill. Four years ago Brand departed Kennedy’s staff as the congressman prepared to retire and became chief of staff to California Democrat Linda Sanchez. Brand told friends this week he’s taking a job as director of public policy and government affairs with Biogen Idec, the huge Massachusetts-based drug company. “It has been a pleasure working with you all, whether in my capacity as a young kid with Leader Gephardt’s operation, at Akin Gump, or over the last eight years as Rep. Kennedy’s and Rep. Sanchez’ chief of staff,” Brand told them in an email. “It has been a great honor and privilege to work for three outstanding, hard-working, and compassionate members of Congress.”

9. Our weekly dispatch from WPRI.com reporter Dan McGowan:Buddy Cianci has spent the better part of the last three weeks telling anyone who will listen that ‘elections are not about the past, they’re about the future.’ But for the 125 or so supporters – some generous estimators suggested the crowd was double that size – who attended his $1,000-a-head fundraiser at the Hilton Hotel in Providence Thursday night, there was a lot of talk about how things used to be. As former longtime Democratic Councilwoman Joan Diruzzo gave me the play-by-play of how ‘we moved the rivers,’ she stressed that Cianci’s ability to get things done was his greatest asset. She also told me that she had no interest in a return to city politics – she lost her Ward 15 seat to Sabina Matos in 2010 – in its current form, but said she will be one of Cianci’s top supporters this year. And that’s what Cianci’s opponents have to contend with. We don’t yet know how many Joan Diruzzos are out there, but we do know that jogging people’s memory about the Cianci era may not be as easy as some of the candidates have hoped. Consider their strategies so far: Democrat-turned-independent Lorne Adrain was the first candidate to openly call for people to stop fawning over Cianci, publishing a Providence Journal op-ed the week before he entered the race. East Side Democrat Brett Smiley has been even more aggressive, sending email blast after email blast ripping the two-time felon. This week, Democrat Jorge Elorza gave us a slight look into the strategy he may incorporate if he advances in the Sept. 9 primary. ‘You’re talking about a guy who takes credit for things he hasn’t done and deflects blame for things he has indeed done,’ Elorza said during a taping of Dan Yorke State of Mind. On the other side is City Council President Michael Solomon, who has seemingly made a conscious effort to avoid stirring it up with the former mayor. The candidates are different, but their message is clear: This is not Joan Diruzzo’s Providence anymore. At least they hope not.”

10. Should Scott Avedisian be worried about his GOP primary challenger, Stacia Petri? Hear her here.

11. Local reformers have spent years pushing Rhode Island lawmakers to crack down on payday loans. But a new analysis from the Urban Institute’s Gregory Mills suggests payday loans aren’t the type of high-cost credit Rhode Islanders are most likely to use. According to Mills, 22,000 Rhode Island households used alternative financial services in 2011, but only 18% of those used payday loans, while 88% used pawnshop loans or rent-to-own agreements. In fact, the use of pawnshop loans was higher in Rhode Island than in any other New England state. “New England households tend to use high-cost nonbank credit products at lower rates than elsewhere in the nation, but regionwide, Maine and Rhode Island have high usage rates,” Mills writes. He suggested their “somewhat less restrictive pawnshop loans and rent-to-own policies may explain the prevalence of such loans in those states.”

12. A hearty congratulations to Warwick Beacon sports editor Will Geoghegan and Langevin spokeswoman Meg Fraser on their wedding Friday! Check out Will’s great column about it.

13. Rhode Island policymakers are always talking about the promise of jobs in the STEM sector – short for science, technology, engineering, and math – but not all STEM skills are created equal, Danielle Kurtzleben reports for Vox. “STEM makes no sense as a category,” Rutgers’ Hal Salzman tells her. “What you have is science and engineering, and then you have this IT labor force.”

14. Also from Vox, check out this fascinating Q&A with Scott Sumner about the Fed and money-printing.

15. Set your DVRs: This week on Newsmakers – a debate between the three candidates for general treasurer: Ernie Almonte, Frank Caprio and Seth Magaziner. Watch Sunday at 10 a.m. on Fox Providence, Sunday at noon on WPRI 12 or Sunday at 7 p.m. on myRITV. This week on Executive SuiteJoe Paolino on Newport Grand, plus The Providence Foundation’s Dan Baudouin and MojoTech’s Nick Kishfy on the new campaign promoting downtown. Watch Saturday at 10:30 p.m. or Sunday at 6 p.m. on myRITV (or Sunday at 6 a.m. on Fox). See you back here next Saturday morning.

Ted Nesi ( tnesi@wpri.com ) covers politics and the economy for WPRI.com and writes the Nesi’s Notes blog. Follow him on Twitter: @tednesi

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30 Responses to “The Saturday Morning Post: Quick hits on politics & more in RI”

  1. Harry says:

    I got called for three polls this week! Block, Gina, and Fung. I got in a fight with the first one who promised me a mail ballot if I said I would vote for Block. No way in hell am I voting for that weasel. Him and Gina. Wow. Talk about people who will say or do anything.

    1. Doug says:

      Block supporters fighting with voters…..why am I not surprised.

      1. Nancy says:

        You know I got the same call but it’s not a poll it’s their voting ID program. It says paid for by Ken Block. When you don’t have the volunteer support to go door to door you pay for it. With my dear friend Tony Bucci wisening up and leaving their campaign and their top operative recruit from Florida left their campaign, you wonder who is left. Besides DeNuccio.

  2. Danielle says:

    Scott Avedisian has been a very good mayor. People like Petrie who don’t offer solutions or have no experience who think they can do it better really get under my skin. Her performance on Dan Yorke made her sound like a ditzy 12 year old.

    I’m tired of these disruptors. We have a very good crop of mayors. Vote out the imbeciles in the GA, but the mayors are on the whole fantastic.

    1. George says:

      If you live in Warwick you know our tax rate has gone up every year with most of the increases going to the pensions that Avadesian and past mayors have given away to the unions. No republican should have public union support. Avadesian is bought and paid for by the unions.

      1. Kristen says:

        And that purist attitude has been why your party has been stuck in the mud for decades.

      2. Bob says:

        exactly. Repubs should be public union nightmares not lapdogs. if you need proof of Scottie’s affinity to unions, just look at Pilgrim High and Post Rd. They look nearly 3rd world because money that should go their upkeep goes to the unions instead.

      3. Bobby G says:

        I new face with fresh ideas is always welcome. Politicians from both parties become complacent and begin to owe people after years in office.

    2. Circus says:

      If she sounds like a ditzy the Danielle Yorke show is a great fit for her. Two girls that can form a bond.

      1. Bobby G says:

        I heard her on wpro and thought she did a good job. She’s not a career politician so she doesn’t have decades of exposure to the media. I’d rather have someone in office who is going to fight for the taxpayers and may not interview well than someone and is an expert at schmoozing and then raises my taxes

      2. View says:

        Bobby G I urge any female running to go on the Danielle Yorke show. Her talk show is the radio version of The View.

  3. Jason says:

    Pell’s ads are such hootenanny. And Projo’s Gregg appearing in one? That doesn’t seem right, never mind ethical.

    Gina’s crossroads might go down as the worst ad in this cycle. Someone on her staff please serve her humble pie. You are more anti-Christ to most versus the messiah.

    The new Block ad featured Steve DeNuccio. If I were a candidate I wouldn’t want that man within 100 miles of me given his reputation. Interesting that block embraces him.

    1. Scott says:

      I wondered about that too. I didn’t think the Journal’s head of the statehouse bureau should be part of a campaign that she is covering. Head scratcher.

    2. Doug says:

      Steve DeNuccio and his creepy PhotoShop pictures will be Block’s undoing. Why any credible candidate would surround themselves with the cast of characters he has, is beyond me.

      1. Nancy says:

        I used to tolerate DeNuccio, but he’s gone too far in this primary. That floods video where he names all of Fung’s staff like they are the cast of some creepy movie is over the big top. Also, the reference to Buffy struck me given all the rumors. Then again Block hired Britt who has a long criminal record so maybe this shouldn’t shock us.

    3. Doug says:

      @ Nancy – I know people who nearly lost everything in those floods. They didn’t think it was funny. And you’re right, the Buffy thing was over the line. Between him and Napolitano they are going to ruin any legitimacy Block may have had.

      1. Doherty Fan says:

        What irks me is that no one is asking if Barbara deserves the monicker. She came from out of no where and made herself queen of everything. So what if there was a website. It was funny. They made blockhead videos. Call it even. Block is our guy!

      2. Doug says:

        Couldn’t tell you one way or the other. But have the guts to say it to her face, no?

      3. Ashley says:

        To the Doherty Fan. You are a disgusting pig. When are pictures of guns to peoples heads ok? You are sick. Sick sick sick. And it is so obvious who did it because only like three people call her that and they are all Block’s back end riders. Barbra Ann has been a fantastic young leader because she doesn’t take any of the old fogies crap. She’s the breath of fresh air we needed and got 15 or 16 or something young republicans to run this year. I am in awe of her positive energy. As evidenced by not letting these idiots and their stupid hardy har har website get to her. She is a role model and one of the nicest people ever.

      4. Rob says:

        Barb is not the problem. She’s the one telling people to grow up. The young republicans really like her and did get in the paper a lot under her. Everyone knows who made that website. I’ve even spoken to a director in Fung’s camp who knew about it months ago. He said Barb said keep it quiet for the party’s sake. All the respect in the world for this girl.

    4. Bobby G says:

      I laughed when I watched Pell’s ad featuring the public school teacher. What does Pell know about public school? He went to elite fancy private schools. If the teacher’s union supports a candidate, you know their focus is not going to be on education, it’s going to be on getting the most for the teachers. You know, the folks who get a full time salary but get summers off and 2 or 3 weeks of vacation during the 10 months that they’re working.

    5. Doug says:

      And with that crowd, every time something doesn’t go there way there’s threats and accusations. I heard DiNuccio made some veiled threats after the nomination committee didn’t go their way. Then that whole crowd insulted the national committeeman and the state chair all over social media. After this is all over, those cancers need to be expelled from the party.

      1. Nicole says:

        Agreed. Forward with Fung, Backwards with Block

  4. SGH says:

    I had forgotten that Caprio tweeted that comment. WTH was he thinking?

    STEM’s other weirdness is the broadness of the science category: covering everything from “hard” sciences like physics, chemistry, etc. to “soft” sciences like psychology, sociology, and anthropology.

    1. Kristen says:

      Since when does STEM include anthropology and sociology? Could you provide examples?

  5. lost in ri says:

    cianci – i would vote for him. the city needs a cheerleader. people are saying he is the only one that can make things happen by a long shot.

    you are not going to see providence grow by cutting costs and raising taxes.

    he knows where every dollar comes from and where every dollar goes and he knows how everyone hired in the city in the last 20 years got their job.

    but there is his other side—–anyone who crossed him while he was out of office will get their walking papers if he wins….

    1. Orange Suit says:

      he knows where every dollar comes from and where every dollar goes and he knows how everyone hired in the city in the last 20 years got their job.

      Sounds like something on the Ft Dix menu.

  6. Check Check says:

    I have noticed some Block signs on Bay St , and Main Rd in Tiverton. I’m not sure but it looks like State or Town property they are on. Can someone verify that ?

    1. Doug says:

      You can always call the town and find out.

      1. Blog it says:

        That’s why we have blogs ;)